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Buffalo Meat Nutrition

Buffalo (Bison) meat has really been catching with the American consumer.  Buffalo is a sweeter meat than beef, with higher protein and flavor, together with more of the important minerals we all need.  There is no hint of a “gamey” taste.  Buffalo is becoming today's red meat. While technically these meat animals should be called North American Bison, hence Bison meat, the general public knows these animals as North American Buffalo and the meat as Buffalo Meat.  Today's animals, which are not endangered species are also not the chewy, range-fed animals of decades ago.  A cousin of commercial beef, this red meat has a flavor reminiscent of beef, yet with a more robust flavor.  A flavor really great on an open flame grill.

When solely grass-fed, buffalo meat has a yellow-tinged fat with a stronger flavor and a tougher consistency than a grain-fed animal. While nutritionally a better source of Omega 3 fatty acids, grass-fed have a toughness and stronger flavor that is NOT a particularly good selling point.  A buffalo meat product must taste good if you expect the consumer to come back for more.  Grande Natural's buffalo meat products are predominately pasture-fed on grass and alfalfa, then grain supplemented for the last 60 to 80 days prior to slaughter. This brings out the more desirable white fat and adds juiciness and tenderness. We never use any steroids, artificial growth stimulants or animal byproducts. It is hard to beat a Grande Natural buffalo rib eye steak seared on the grill to a delicious rare to medium rare finish.

Buffalo meat is a great source of numerous vitamins and minerals. It is high in B12, B6, potassium, iron, zinc, copper and selenium, while lower in sodium, calories and cholesterol.

Buffalo meat cuts are similar to beef with all your favorite beef cuts present on a buffalo as well. The only real difference is the amount of fat.  Since buffalo are generally less fatty than beef, cooking time is a bit faster, and it is always better to have the meat more on the rare end of the scale.  Less fat in turn means more protein per ounce. Protein is more filling than fat, so the serving portions of buffalo meat can be a bit smaller yet they will still leave you satisfied. You do need to remember however, that less fat means that juiciness exits the longer the meat is cooked.  Well done requires wet cooking (steaming or crock pot) or an overnight marinade.  I am sure, with a little practice it will be BON APETITE!

 

Buffalo Meat

Raw Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 4 ounces (1.3g)


Amount per Serving
Calories 124 Calories from fat 19
  % daily value
Total Fat 2.0g 3%
Saturated Fat 0.8 3%
Stearic Acid 0 g.
Polyunsaturated 0.22 g.
Monounsaturated 0.82 g.
Cholesterol 72 mg 24%
Sodium 60mg 2.5%
Potassium 388mg 11%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0 g 0%
Soluble Fiber 0 g.  
Insoluble Fiber 0 g.  
Sugars 0 g  
Sugar Alcohols 0 g.  
Other Carbohydrates 0 g.  
Protein 24.5gm

Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium <1% Iron 16%
Vitamin E 0% Thiamin 8%
Riboflavin 6% Niacin 11%
Vitamin B6  <1% Folate <1%
Vitamin B12  21%  
Pantothenic Acid Phosphorus 21%
Iodine Magnesium 7%
Zinc 21% Copper 5%
Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be bigger depending on your calorie needs
Calories per gram
Fat 9 Car 4 Protein 4

Bison Meat (Buffalo Meat), separable lean only, raw

NDB No: 17156 (Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion)
Scientific Name:  Bison bison
Common Name:  buffalo
Refuse: 0%  
 

Nutrient Units Value per
100 grams
Number
of Data
Points
Std.
Error
Proximates
Water
g
74.57
33
0.259
Energy
kcal
109
0
0
Energy
kj
456
0
0
Protein
g
21.62
33
0.164
Total lipid (fat)
g
1.84
33
0.158
Ash
g
1.20
33
0.037
Carbohydrate, by difference
g
0.00
0
0
Fiber, total dietary
g
0.0
0
0
Minerals
Calcium, Ca
mg
6
23
0.24
Iron, Fe
mg
2.60
30
0.06
Magnesium, Mg
mg
25
30
0.329
Phosphorus, P
mg
187
30
2.611
Potassium, K
mg
343
30
5.295
Sodium, Na
mg
54
30
0.913
Zinc, Zn
mg
2.80
30
0.069
Copper, Cu
mg
0.090
30
0.01
Manganese, Mn
mg
0.007
30
0
Selenium, Se
mcg
27.0
0
0
Vitamins
Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid
mg
0.0
0
0
Riboflavin
mg
0.094
24
0.007
Niacin()
g
1.910
24
0.117
Vitamin A, IU
IU
0
0
0
Vitamin A, RAE
mcg_RAE
0
0
0
Retinol
mcg
0
0
0
Lipids
Fatty acids, total saturated
g
0.690
0
0
14:0
g
0.020
22
0
16:0
g
0.330
22
0
18:0
g
0.350
22
0
Fatty acids, total monounsaturated
g
0.720
0
0
16:1 undifferentiated
g
0.040
22
0
18:1 undifferentiated
g
0.670
22
0
Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated
g
0.190
0
0
18:2 undifferentiated
g
0.110
22
0
18:3 undifferentiated
g
0.030
22
0
20:4 undifferentiated
g
0.050
22
0
Cholesterol
mg
62
50
2.437
Amino acids
Threonine
g
0.890
1
0
Isoleucine
g
0.911
1
0
Leucine
g
1.679
1
0
Lysine
g
1.686
1
0
Methionine
g
0.513
1
0
Phenylalanine
g
0.809
1
0
Tyrosine
g
0.695
1
0
Valine
g
0.978
1
0
Arginine
g
1.282
1
0
Histidine
g
0.573
1
0
Alanine
g
1.228
1
0
Aspartic acid
g
1.875
1
0
Glutamic acid
g
3.150
1
0
Glycine
g
1.039
1
0
Proline
g
0.863
1
0
Serine
g
0.823
1
0


Footnotes:
Data represent composite of clod (chuck), ribeye, top round and top sirloin for 24 bison.
 

USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20 (2007)

BUFFALO MEAT
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION
 


BUFFALO (BISON) meat is low in saturated fat and and slightly lower cholesterol than most other red meats.  Buffalo are never fed any steroids,  hormones or growth antibiotics. 

These charts are  modified from "The Wild Diet" Outdoor Life, 8/02, by Kathy Etling.

Good Fat, Bad Fat
Species     %Saturated       (bad fat) %Fatty Acids
Monounsaturated (good fat)
%Polyunsaturated (good fat)
Buffalo 43.2 45.0 11.8
Elk 48.4 26.6 24.9
Mule Deer 48.0 31.8 20.2
Caribou 46.6 36.4 17.0
Whitetail Deer 45.6 30.6 23.9
Beef 46.3 45.5 8.2
Antelope 41.2 27.1 31.6
Rabbit 39.0 35.6 25.4
Goat 36.9 54.0 9.1
Moose 36.6 24.3 39.1
Boar 35.7 47. 17.3
Squirrel 15.2 47.2 37.6
Some game meat is high in dietary cholesterol than domestic meats, but the combination of more lean body tissue, generally fewer calories, less saturated fat and significantly higher percentage of cholesterol-reducing polyunsaturated fatty acids makes buffalo a heart-healthy choice. 
Source: North Dakota Sate University and U.S. Department of Agriculture

Nutrient Content: Tale of the Tape
Species Protein % Fat % Cholesterol (mg/100g*) Calories (Kcal/100g*)
Buffalo 21.7 1.9 62 138
Beef (USDA choice) 22.0 6.5 72 180
Beef (USDA standard) 22.7 2.0 69 152
Lamb 20.8 5.7 66 167
Pork 22.3 4.9 71 165
Goat 22.0 3.0 75 144
Wild Boar** 28.3 4.38 109 160
Whitetail Deer 23.6 1.4 116 149
Mule Deer 23.7 1.3 107 145
Elk 22.8 .9 67 137
Moose 22.1 .5 71 130
Antelope 22.5 .9 112 144
Squirrel 21.4 3.2 83 149
Cottontail 21.8 2.4 77 144
Jackrabbit 21.9 2.4 131 153
Chicken 23.6 .7 62 135
Turkey (domestic) 23.5 1.5 60 146
Wild Turkey 25.7 1.1 55 163
Pheasant (domestic) 23.9 .8 71 144
Wild Pheasant 25.7 .6 52 148
Gray Partridge 25.6 .7 85 151
Sharptail Grouse 23.8 .7 105 142
Sage Grouse 23.7 1.1 101 140
Dove 22.9 1.8 94 145
Sandhill Crane 21.7 2.4 123 153
Snow Goose 22.7 3.6 142 121
Duck (domestic) 19.9 4.25 89 180
Mallard 23.1 2.0 140 152
Widgeon 22.6 2.1 131 153

*100 grams equals about 3 1/2 ounces.

** Not trimmed of fat before analysis.

In the above chart, all visible fat was trimmed before analysis. However, surveys show that carcasses of domesticated animals have 25 to 30 percent fat while the average fat content of wild game animals is only 4.3 percent. Not only is the quantity of fat lower in game, but the quantity is also healthier. Fat from wild game contains a much higher proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids-good fat- and is lower in saturated fat-bad fat.

Source: North Dakota State University


NO GAMEY TASTE.

 

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