Elk Meat


If you are lost....always return to HOME Questions?  Email us

Offering the finest of gourmet meats since 1998!


Go to: Goat Meat Sales

Goat Meat Nutrition

What does 70% of the world know about, that us American's don't?  Well, would you believe goat meat is a great tasting red meat and is quite nutritious as well.  The key to a tasty meat is to make sure only young goats are processed, and processed quickly to minimize stress and quality deterioration.  All our products are derived from yearling or younger meat goat animals.  All are done under USDA inspection and are fully cryovac (vacuum-sealed) packaged and flash frozen to -20 degrees.  Grande Natural goat meat is raised with no steroids, no growth-promoting antibiotics and no animal byproducts.  It is red meat as it should be!

Goat meat, also known as Chevon (northern Europe), Capretto (Australia & Southern Europe) or Cabrito (Hispanic) has been around since the advent of civilization, yet here in the States it has taken a back seat to massed-produced beef, pork and chicken.  Good goat meat was just plain hard to find.  But not any more! Grande Natural is offering the finest of young goat meat, now available via the internet to all at competitive prices.  While the just name “Goat Meat” may instill a negative vibe, don't let that stop you.  Goat is the rising star in the red meat proteins and you need to find out why.

Lower in total fat, saturated fat, calories and cholesterol than traditional meats, it just might be the perfect red meat for you.  While not as lean as elk, deer or grass-fed buffalo, it is certainly not as rich as lamb, yet retains a sweet flavor reminiscent to lamb.  Protein content is similar, but goat has some unique saturated fat and cholesterol characteristics.  Goat fat has much less saturated fat and higher levels of mono- and polyunsaturated fat, a fact that can be visually observed in the more liquid goat fat drippings after cooking.  Less saturated fat and hence, less cholesterol means a healthier red meat for you. Additionally goat meat has higher values in iron, potassium, and thiamine together with less sodium than traditional meats here in the USA.  50% less fat than beef, 45% less fat than lamb, 15% less fat than veal, yet a great taste. What is there not to like in goat meat?

 

Goat Meat

Raw Nutrition Facts

Serving Size 4 ounces (1.3g)


Amount per Serving
Calories 124 Calories from fat 15
  % daily value
Total Fat 2.6g 5%
Saturated Fat 0.8 3%
Stearic Acid 0 g.
Polyunsaturated 0 g.
Monounsaturated 0 g.
Cholesterol 64 mg 22%
Sodium 92mg 4%
Potassium 436mg 12%
Total Carbohydrate 0 g 0%
Dietary Fiber 0 g 0%
Soluble Fiber 0 g.  
Insoluble Fiber 0 g.  
Sugars 0 g  
Sugar Alcohols 0 g.  
Other Carbohydrates 0 g.  
Protein 25gm

Vitamin A 0% Vitamin C 0%
Calcium 2% Iron 18%
Vitamin E 0% Thiamin 8%
Riboflavin 33% Niacin 21%
Vitamin B6  <1% Folate <1%
Vitamin B12  21%  
Pantothenic Acid Phosphorus 20%
Iodine Magnesium
Zinc 30% Copper 15%
Percent Daily Values are based on a 2,000 calorie diet. Your daily values may be bigger depending on your calorie needs
Calories per gram
Fat 9 Car 4 Protein 4

Return to: Goat Meat Sales

Goat, raw (trimmed of all fat)

NDB No: 17168 (Nutrient values and weights are for edible portion)
Refuse: 0%  
 

Nutrient

Units

Value per
100 grams

Number
of Data
Points

Std.
Error

Proximates

Water

g
75.84
92
0.215

Energy

kcal
109
0
0

Energy

kj
456
0
0

Protein

g
20.60
97
0.179

Total lipid (fat)

g
2.31
118
0.102

Ash

g
1.11
91
0.021

Carbohydrate, by difference

g
0.00
0
0

Fiber, total dietary

g
0.0
0
0

Minerals

Calcium, Ca

mg
13
14
1.366

Iron, Fe

mg
2.83
52
0.207

Phosphorus, P

mg
180
14
11.701

Potassium, K

mg
385
7
8.52

Sodium, Na

mg
82
7
5.598

Zinc, Zn

mg
4.00
47
0.088

Copper, Cu

mg
0.256
46
0.015

Manganese, Mn

mg
0.038
46
0.004

Selenium, Se

mcg
8.8
0
0

Vitamins

Vitamin C, total ascorbic acid

mg
0.0
0
0

Thiamin

mg
0.110
6
0.009

Riboflavin

mg
0.490
6
0.053

Niacin

mg
3.750
9
0.19

Folate, total

mcg
5
1
0

Folic acid

mcg
0
0
0

Folate, food

mcg
5
1
0

Folate, DFE

mcg_DFE
5
0
0

Vitamin B-12

mcg
1.13
1
0

Vitamin A, IU

IU
0
0
0

Vitamin A, RAE

mcg_RAE
0
0
0

Retinol

mcg
0
0
0

Lipids

Fatty acids, total saturated

g
0.710
0
0

10:0

g
0.000
13
0

12:0

g
0.000
13
0

14:0

g
0.030
13
0

16:0

g
0.330
13
0

18:0

g
0.330
13
0

Fatty acids, total monounsaturated

g
1.030
0
0

16:1 undifferentiated

g
0.040
13
0

18:1 undifferentiated

g
0.940
13
0

Fatty acids, total polyunsaturated

g
0.170
0
0

18:2 undifferentiated

g
0.100
13
0

18:3 undifferentiated

g
0.020
13
0

20:4 undifferentiated

g
0.060
13
0

Cholesterol

mg
57
7
1.792

Amino acids

Tryptophan

g
0.306
1
0

Threonine

g
0.981
1
0

Isoleucine

g
1.042
1
0

Leucine

g
1.716
1
0

Lysine

g
1.532
1
0

Methionine

g
0.552
1
0

Cystine

g
0.245
1
0

Phenylalanine

g
0.715
1
0

Tyrosine

g
0.633
1
0

Valine

g
1.103
1
0

Arginine

g
1.512
1
0

Histidine

g
0.429
1
0
USDA National Nutrient Database for Standard Reference, Release 20 (2007)

Return to: Goat Meat Sales


GOAT MEAT
NUTRITIONAL INFORMATION


Goat meat is low in saturated fat and and slightly lower cholesterol than most other red meats.  Goats are never fed any steroids,  hormones or growth antibiotics. 

These charts are  modified from "The Wild Diet" Outdoor Life, 8/02, by Kathy Etling.

Good Fat, Bad Fat
Species     %Saturated       (bad fat) %Fatty Acids
Monounsaturated (good fat)
%Polyunsaturated (good fat)
Elk 48.4 26.6 24.9
Mule Deer 48.0 31.8 20.2
Caribou 46.6 36.4 17.0
Whitetail Deer 45.6 30.6 23.9
Beef 46.3 45.5 8.2
Buffalo 43.2 45.0 11.8
Antelope 41.2 27.1 31.6
Rabbit 39.0 35.6 25.4
Goat 36.9 54.0 9.1
Moose 36.6 24.3 39.1
Boar 35.7 47. 17.3
Squirrel 15.2 47.2 37.6
Some game meat is high in dietary cholesterol than domestic meats, but the combination of more lean body tissue, generally fewer calories, less saturated fat and significantly higher percentage of cholesterol-reducing polyunsaturated fatty acids makes goat a heart-healthy choice. 
Source: North Dakota Sate University and U.S. Department of Agriculture

Nutrient Content: Tale of the Tape
Species Protein % Fat % Cholesterol (mg/100g*) Calories (Kcal/100g*)
Goat 22.0 3.0 75 144
Beef (USDA choice) 22.0 6.5 72 180
Beef (USDA standard) 22.7 2.0 69 152
Lamb 20.8 5.7 66 167
Pork 22.3 4.9 71 165
Wild Boar** 28.3 4.38 109 160
Buffalo 21.7 1.9 62 138
Whitetail Deer 23.6 1.4 116 149
Mule Deer 23.7 1.3 107 145
Elk 22.8 .9 67 137
Moose 22.1 .5 71 130
Antelope 22.5 .9 112 144
Squirrel 21.4 3.2 83 149
Cottontail 21.8 2.4 77 144
Jackrabbit 21.9 2.4 131 153
Chicken 23.6 .7 62 135
Turkey (domestic) 23.5 1.5 60 146
Wild Turkey 25.7 1.1 55 163
Pheasant (domestic) 23.9 .8 71 144
Wild Pheasant 25.7 .6 52 148
Gray Partridge 25.6 .7 85 151
Sharptail Grouse 23.8 .7 105 142
Sage Grouse 23.7 1.1 101 140
Dove 22.9 1.8 94 145
Sandhill Crane 21.7 2.4 123 153
Snow Goose 22.7 3.6 142 121
Duck (domestic) 19.9 4.25 89 180
Mallard 23.1 2.0 140 152
Widgeon 22.6 2.1 131 153

*100 grams equals about 3 1/2 ounces.

** Not trimmed of fat before analysis.

In the above chart, all visible fat was trimmed before analysis. However, surveys show that carcasses of domesticated animals have 25 to 30 percent fat while the average fat content of wild game animals is only 4.3 percent. Not only is the quantity of fat lower in game, but the quantity is also healthier. Fat from wild game contains a much higher proportion of polyunsaturated fatty acids-good fat- and is lower in saturated fat-bad fat.

Source: North Dakota State University


NO GAMEY TASTE.

Questions?  Email us

Return to: Goat Meat Sales

 

Store Items


Home | Sales